Press – Doug Ericksen Recall

Here you will find press regarding 42nd District Senator Doug Ericksen and controversies surrounding his dual jobs in both Olympia and at the EPA in Washington, DC. Media coverage has grown to the national level. Keep up the good work! If you know of articles or letters not listed here, please let us know and we will add them. The following links are listed by category in chronological order.

Articles and Editorials

1/25/17 Cascadia Weekly

1/31/17 Seattle Times

1/31/17 Bellingham Herald

2/1/17 Seattle Times

2/1/17 Lynden Tribune

2/1/17 KOMO4 

2/1/17 Tacoma News Tribune 

2/1/17 Seattle PI

2/2/17 Bellingham Herald

2/2/17 KUOW

2/2/17 The Olympian

2/2/17 Washington Democrats (press release)

2/6/17 Tacoma News Tribune

2/6/17 Washington Post

2/8/17 Seattle Weekly

2/8/17 Tacoma News Tribune

2/8/17 The Stranger (mention in SLOG)

2/8/17 Lynden Tribune

2/9/17 Northern Light

2/9/17 The Stranger (mention in SLOG)

2/10/17 Bellingham Herald

2/10/17 KGMI

2/10/17 KOMO4

2/10/17 Q13Fox

2/10/17 The Olympian (this is an AP story)

2/10/17 The News Tribune (AP story)

2/15/17 Seattle PI

2/15/17 Bellingham Herald

2/15/17 KAFE 104.1

2/22/17 Cascadia Weekly

2/22/17 Real Change News

2/27/17 Q13 Fox

2/27/17 Spokesman Review

2/27/17 Lynden Tribune

3/1/17 Whatcom Watch

3/1/17 – Cascadia Weekly

3/1/17 – Bellingham Herald

3/1/17 Lynden Tribune

3/2/17 KPUG

3/3/17 KPUG

3/3/17 Q13 Fox

3/3/17 Bellingham Herald

3/3/17 All Point Bulletin

3/3/17 KISM

3/4/17 Seattle PI

3/4/17 Centralia Chronicle (AP Story)

3/4/17 Bellingham Herald

3/4/17 KPUG

3/4/17 Northwest Citizen

3/5/17 Crosscut

3/7/17 New York Times (brief mention of Ericksen on EPA staff and climate change denier)

3/8/17 Cascadia Weekly

3/8/17 Bellingham Herald

3/8/17 Lynden Tribune

3/9/17 KGMI

3/16/17 Seattle PI

3/16/17 The News Tribune

3/16/17 Oregon Public Broadcasting

Letters to the Editor

1/26/17 Seattle Times

1/26/17 Bellingham Herald Online (listed for week of 1/26)

1/29/17 Bellingham Herald – three letters printed in Sunday paper. Working on getting online link.

2/1/17 Lynden Tribune

2/1/17 Northern Light

2/1/17 Cascadia Weekly (archived issue, 2 LTE)

2/2/17 Bellingham Herald Online (listed for week of 2/2)

2/15/17 Cascadia Weekly (archived issue, 1 LTE)

2/15/17 Northern Light

2/22/17 Cascadia Weekly (archived issue, 2 LTE)

3/1/17 Cascadia Weekly (archived issue, 2 LTE)

3/8/17 Cascadia Weekly (archived issue, 3 LTE)

3/15/17 Cascadia Weekly (archived issue, 2 LTE, plus correction from Doug)

 

Step Five to Taking Action

How are you doing? What was the last action you took?

Maybe you’re feeling fired up and taking action every day.  Maybe you’re starting to feel overwhelmed and disheartened by the news each day, making it hard to act.  Maybe life has interrupted and your best intentions have taken a backseat to dealing with urgent personal matters.

No matter how many actions you’ve taken so far, know this: WE ARE IN THIS FOR THE LONG HAUL.

This is not normal.  And we must never ever allow ourselves to let it feel normal.

There is no finish line. No future end date we are aiming towards.  This is not a diet or a challenge or a campaign.

This is brushing your teeth.  This is grocery shopping.  This is paying bills.  This is exercise.  This is drinking coffee.  This is weeding the garden.

This is a habit. This is you making a permanent slot in your regular routine for taking action to protect our rights, fight injustice and inequality, and protect vulnerable populations.  You can do it.  You must.

Good news!  You already know how to start new habits.  (And if your life does not allow you to commit to a new habit right now, work in actions as much as you can until you have more bandwidth.)

Tips for Sustaining Action

Schedule it

Set aside some time for your reading the news, researching, reading books, writing letters, making calls, and planning actions. Schedule it on your calendar just like any other appointment and set a reminder. 

Remember to set up recurring, monthly donations, too.

 

Narrow Your Focus

There are so many actions to take and so much work to do.  It can feel overwhelming.  One way to fight this problem is to narrow your focus to your top three issues you are most passionate about.  Follow groups that are organizing issues on those topics.  Maybe you’ll branch out in the future, the most important thing is to keep acting and not get stuck at inaction.  Keep this in mind, though.

 

Use a Cheat Sheet

People out there are doing the  work of researching and selecting regular actions so that you don’t have to.  Here are a few cheat sheets to follow that will deliver regular actions to you, along with the rationale and sources behind them.

Wall of Us

Pantsuit Resources

Resistance 365

Fight Trump

Resist Tinyletter

 

Join a Group

Thousands of grassroots groups sprung up immediately after the election with the purpose of organizing action against Trump. These groups are working online and in person.  They are planning actions on a local level,  state level, national level, and world level.  Find one near you. (This list is not comprehensive, but a good round up.)

 

Form an Accountability Circle

This is simple.  Find some buddies who also are taking and agree to regularly check in with each other to see how it’s going.  Meet in person, do a group chat online, form a Facebook group, or however you want to go about it.  Every (one, two, three) weeks, ask everyone to report in with their latest actions. Knowing someone is going to check on you can give you that extra motivation you need.


Or, simply post your latest actions on social media and ask what your friends have been up to.  Use this hashtag: #actionaccountability

 

Celebrate, Reward, and Take Care of Yourself

Are you tired yet?  I am.  This work is exhausting physically and emotionally. Don’t burn out. Please take care of yourself.    We need you and your voice.  Take a break when you need to, but come back, refreshed and full of fire. Practice your favorite self-care.  Reward yourself for taking action.  And celebrate our victories!  Because there will be victories.  You can do it.  You must.  Remember, we are the ones we have been waiting for.

Missed step four? Read it here.

Take action:

Step Four to Taking Action

Here we go- time to get busy.  Let’s look at how you can use your time to influence change.

Some of these actions are quick and introvert-friendly.  Some are harder and require you to step out of your comfort zone.  You can do it.

 

Petition (quick and easy, but low impact)

Signing online petitions is a simple, entry-level action.  You sign your name and zip code to support a cause you believe in. It takes about 30 seconds.  BUT, it’s hard to say how much they actually accomplish. (Read here, here, and here.)  Keep in mind that signing will probably get you on an email list, and right after you sign, you will probably be asked to donate money and share the petition.  That being said, there’s no harm in signing a petition, as long as it’s not the only action you take.

Here are some petition sources:

Moveon.org

CREDO Action

Petition the White House

Moms Rising

 

Vote (moderate research time, impactful, it’s your duty)

Duh.  You must vote. Vote in every election: local, state, and national.  Vote, vote, vote. Here’s some ways to get informed:

Vote Smart

Vote 411

Tell your friends, family, and neighbors to vote, too.  If our friends just voted in local and midterm elections we could change the world. Far too many people (it would surprise you who) are inconsistent in voting.  We should all be helping to get out the vote. Check out the Whatcom Democrats for get out the vote opportunities.

 

Call and Write Letters (quick to moderate time, moderate impact)

Contacting politicians and policy makers to share your opinion about specific issues is a simple, tried and true way to influence change.  If you’ve never done it, it can sound intimidating.  Luckily, there are scripts out there to follow to make it easy.  And the people who answer the phones are nice.  You don’t have to be a political junkie to call or write.  These public servants are there to serve YOU.  Let them know what you think.

Tip: Write handwritten letters instead of using the contact forms on their webpages or sending email.  Real letters get noticed.

Tip: Put the numbers for your congresspeople (state and national) in your phone.  You’re going to be calling them a lot. Find your elected officials.

Fabulous, rich resource: The Sixty-Five

Sometimes it’s as simple as a postcard campaign or a letter writing campaign.

 

Attend Town Hall Meetings (moderate time, high impact)

Word is, the best way to get your legislator’s attention is to attend one of their Town Hall meetings and ask questions.  Check out this wonderful, detailed guide put together by a handful of former DC staffers.  And, this former congressman confirms it: go to the Town Halls and ask hard questions.

 

Protest (moderate time, high profile impact)

Seattle Womxn’s March

Why should YOU participate in a peaceful protest?  Read this.

For many of us, this will be our first time protesting.  You don’t have to be a young radical to protest.  Here are some tips for protesters.  (These are very practical and may make you feel uncomfortable.  Peaceful, organized protests are not without risk, but they are entirely different than violent destruction and looting.)

Tips from the ACLU

More tips

Watch the news and your networks for upcoming peaceful protests.  There will be many.

Watch for local Planned Parenthood support rallies to counter anti-PP vigils.

Bellingham is the home of the longest running weekly peace vigil in the country. Downtown, every Friday from 4-5.

 

Volunteer (moderate to high time, high impact)

Remember all those organizations (big and small) you just donated too?  They could use your time, too. Most of them have volunteer opportunities.  Yes, life is busy.  Sometimes there are volunteer opportunities that can be accomplished online, from the comfort of your pjs. Look into it. Bonus- it’s good for your health!

Serve 306 is asking you to pledge 306 hours of volunteer time over the next four years.  That’s about 1.5 hours per week. Totally doable.

Also, your city or county probably has boards and commissions that need volunteers to guide decisions. Here’s Whatcom County’s current vacancies.

 

Campaign (moderate to high time, high impact)

Signing up as a volunteer for a political party or organization will get you on the list of folks to help out in the next campaign, whether it’s local, state, or national.  There are lots of ways to help a campaign, ranging from low to high time commitment.

Democrats

Bernie

 

Run for office (high time, high impact)

Yes, you!  If you are passionate about local issues, consider running for local office: School Board, City Council, etc.  Especially if you’re a woman.

 

Try a few of these and see how it goes.  Then try a few more.

Next up, the final step: sustaining action.

Missed step three? Read it here.

Ready for step five? Read it here.

Take action:

Step Three to Taking Action

Now you are informed and ready- time to act! Your best two tactics are your money and your time. Let’s talk $$.

Photo by Newton Free Library on flickr. Used under Creative Commons license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

First, donations.

There are a bajillion organizations working to do good. Many run on donations. It can be hard to figure out who to donate to. What do you care about? Which organizations are legit? How much money? How often? What about local groups vs. national organizations?

Narrow it down
This might be difficult. Many of us care about all of it- the environment, women’s rights, healthcare, LGBTQ rights, etc. Try picking your top three issues and start with those. Maybe even make a calendar where you focus on different issues each month or quarter.
This is a good list of ideas (check the comments, too): http://jezebel.com/a-list-of-pro-wo…

Find legitimate organizations
Charity Navigator is a great tool to help you decide who will use your donation effectively.

Every bit helps
If you only have a few bucks to spare and are wondering if it’s even worth donating that much, know that it DOES HELP. We are working on a scale of millions of people making donations. A buck or two adds up.

If you can swing an automatic monthly donation, go for it.

Think globally, act locally (and nationally and globally)
Don’t forget about your hometown organizations. You can often have the most impact with these small fish. Use our Civic Tithing tool to help find local organizations and set up monthly donations. Also, Charity Navigator has a rich search function, including a way to look for local charities: https://www.charitynavigator.org/in…

 

It’s also time to boycott

You can also make a difference with your everyday spending habits.

Anti-Trump
You can choose to spend your money at places that do not support Trump or his family’s businesses. Shannon Coulter started the #grabyourwallet boycott in late October. Here is the current list of business to boycott, scripts to use to tell them why you’re boycotting, and alternative businesses to use instead: https://grabyourwallet.org/

Pro-justice
You can also sign up to participate in the Injustice Boycott, which began last December. This boycott is about preventing police brutality and racial injustice.
Do you know of any other current boycotts?

That’s your first action: donate and spend wisely. Next up, how to use your time to make a difference.

Missed step two? Read it here.

Ready for step four? Read it here.

Take action:

SB 5171 – Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve

Our eyes are on the prize of a clean energy future.  We know the carbon must stay in the ground, and we have worked for years to reject proposals to transport it through our neighborhoods and export it from Xwe’chieXen, traditional fishing grounds of our Lummi neighbors.

Just weeks ago, after years of study and public input and the denial of permits for the  Gateway Pacific Terminal – which would have been North America’s largest coal terminal – Washington DNR commissioner Peter Goldmark updated the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve boundary to include the pier-shaped hole once reserved for the pier.  Do you see it there on the map below, just below Henry Rd?  Since there will be no pier built, the cut out is not necessary.

Senate Bill 5171 proposes we re-open the possibility of a fossil fuel export pier in the herring spawning area by reversing the DNR decision.  It is a signal to fossil fuel darlings in DC that there’s still hope for the GPT project.

We are having none of it.  We can kill this bill and send a strong message that any efforts to revive the project are wasted.


The bill will be heard by the Senate Natural Resources Committee on TUESDAY JANUARY 24th.  We expect tribal leaders from throughout the state to attend and speak against the bill.  You have three choices for action.

  1. Attend the hearing in Olympia – WEAR RED. 1:30pm (subject to change) Natural Resources & Parks, Senate Full Committee, Senate Hearing Rm 3, J.A. Cherberg Building, 304 15th Ave SW, Olympia, WA 98501
    Pantsuit Bellingham members RSVP here.
    Carpools are being organized from Whatcom County.
    If you are not a member of Pantsuit Bellingham RSVP here.
  2. UPDATE: calls worked!  No more calls needed.
  3. Watch the hearing on the live broadcast.  If you are a member of the Pantsuit Bellingham Facebook group, you can participate in the watch party.

Step One to Taking Action

Since the election, everyone is talking about taking action and asking you to act, too.*

Let’s take a step back- maybe you’re not sure where to start or are feeling overwhelmed?

The world feels a bit topsy-turvy in the worst sort of way right now. And then on top of it, many people are telling you to call this person and sign this petition and donate here. It can be easy to get stuck at inaction from feeling overwhelmed.

Whatever your level of political activism has been, it’s time to take it up two notches. Our best chance to protect the rights and freedoms we have fought for over the last generations is to make your voice heard. If we all do a little, it will add up to a lot. You can do it. You must.

“emma reading the newspaper” by Diego Sevilla Ruiz on flickr. Used under Creative Commons license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

The first step to sorting through everything is to get informed.

You need to be up to speed on what’s happening in order to decide what actions to take. One of the challenges is that the media is often biased, both to the right and to the left.

Here are the least biased news sources: https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/cent…

Along with the neutral sites, try adding in a few sites that lean slightly left and some that lean slightly right to get a sense of the whole picture.

Avoid sites that are extremely biased or flat out false. Here’s some tips for spotting fake news: https://www.facebook.com/OnTheMedia…

Here are some known fake news sites to avoid: http://www.snopes.com/2016/01/14/fa…

That’s step one. Pay attention, watch your sources.  Stay tuned for step two.

*For why you should take action, see here and here.

Take action:

Civic Tithing

Civic tithing can stabilize funding for our local organizations in an uncertain economic future. And that future will arrive on January 20. From the Old English for “one-tenth”, tithing has traditionally meant giving part of one’s income to a church or government. In civic tithing, we take the routine giving concept and apply it to civic and community organizations in Whatcom County. Together, our group could improve and stabilize the financial outlook for organizations serving our community in 2017.

First, decide how much of your income you could part with on a monthly or yearly basis, whether 0.1% or 10%. Take the annual cost and divide by 12. Then set up monthly donations to an organization in that amount.

To help you identify organizations, a few Riveters Collective members curated this list for us. Improvements to this list and tool are coming, but we’re pushing this in draft form so you can start using it now. You can search by topic; that’s pretty much the only bell or whistle.

Please note: As always, we welcome your constructive feedback (especially if it is packaged with an offer of help in improving the online accessibility of this list)!

Take action:
How much $/month are you pledging to donate to these groups? Enter the monthly total in the box. Your response is ANONYMOUS and will help Pantsuit Bellingham demonstrate our people power!

Sanctuary X – A Status Report

The president-elect’s statements around deportation of undocumented people has prompted a call for bold statements from local institutions. Our Sanctuary X action team is researching what it means to be a “Sanctuary” city or institution, what institutions can and should take a position on immigration enforcement, and the current state of their policies (see our draft here).

Our Sanctuary X group is compiling answers to these questions so we can:

1. Identify opportunities for action. How do current policies compare with the goals of groups representing undocumented people – such as Western’s Blue Group and Community to Community Development?

2. Identify mechanisms for filling the gaps. How can we join the efforts of existing groups? Where efforts don’t already exist, how can we be most effective.

3. Take action to affect progress toward the identified goals.

If you have relevant information or want to work with us on supporting the human rights of undocumented people in our community, please send an email to pantsuitbellingham@gmail.com .

Diverse Books Pledge

Literature that “reflects and honors the lives of all young people” (www.weneeddiversebooks.org) is essential to creating a more just society.  Children, and the people who read to them, benefit immeasurably from both seeing themselves in books and from the opportunity to listen to and learn one another’s stories.  Currently, the experiences of people of color, people with disabilities,  and LBGTQ  people are vastly under-represented in children’s and young adult books.  Let’s help change that!

Wade Hudson, CEO of Just Us Books, an independent publisher that celebrates the diversity of Black people, history, and culture, offers a Diverse Books Pledge which provides ideas for concrete  actions to make a difference.  It begins…

To help increase the number of quality children’s books that help celebrate diversity, and to support the diverse books already available, I pledge to:  

…and goes on to outline 10 very do-able steps to take, from buying books from small presses/publishers owned by people of color, to writing on-line reviews.

Some resources to help in carrying out the Diverse Books Pledge:

Websites/Book Lists

We Need Diverse Books  – a great resource for information and inspiration, including a full page of book lists.  We Need Diverse Books is grassroots organization of children’s book lovers that advocates essential changes in the publishing industry to produce and promote literature that reflects and honors the lives of all young people.

Lee & Low Blog – Lee & Low: About Everyone, For Everyone, is the largest multicultural children’s book publisher in the country, and also one of the few minority-owned publishers in the U.S.  Their blog highlights a variety of books and offers author interviews and educator resources.

Coretta Scott King Book Award -given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.

Pura Belpre Award -is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.

Mighty Girl Book Lists -Offers a huge collection of titles with filters that make for efficient searching.

50 Multicultural Books Every Child Should Know – an age appropriate list of titles compiled by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a study and research library.

Publishers/Small Presses

Person of Color Owned Small Presses/Publishers

Articles

The Apartheid of Children’s Literature  by Christopher Myers

Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books? by Walter Dean Myers

Equity in Publishing: What Should Editors Be Doing?  by Antonio Aiello