ACTION ALERT: Protect our National Monuments: Keep it in the Ground!

Description: President Trump has ordered the Department of the Interior to review all designations of national monuments greater than 100,000 acres created since 1996.  Removing Monument protection will open the areas up to potential coal, oil and gas exploitation that would increase greenhouse gas emissions, hasten global warming, and cause untold harm to public health and safety, infrastructure and property, and ecosystems and species.

 This is the last week for comment: deadline is July 10, 2017.

Background:  On April 26, 2017, the White House issued a Presidential Executive Order on the Review of Designations under the Antiquities Act, directing the U.S. Department of the Interior to review certain National Monuments designated or expanded since 1996.  Removing protections will open monuments to coal, oil, and gas exploration, .  The Secretary of the Interior will use the review to determine whether each designation or expansion conforms to the policy stated in the Executive Order and to formulate recommendations for Presidential actions, legislative proposals, or other appropriate actions to carry out that policy.  The list of National Monuments under review can be found here.

Contact Information:  Submit comments online through regulations.gov (Docket ID# DOI-2017-0002).

Suggested Scripts:  Indivisible Washington Environment Network and others are sharing comments to inspire and inform your own.  Limited in time?  Use the generic script and submit for as many monuments as you can.  If you have more time, check out the aditional suggestions below.

Generic Script (adapted from several sources)

I oppose any effort to reduce the size of this National Monument.  Reducing National Monument protection will open the area to coal, oil, and gas exploration and exploitation, protracting the demise of an industry that has little future viability and delaying the transition to clean energy.  Considering the external costs of fossil fuel-based energy (associated with impacts to public health, property damage, and natural  resources provisioning), clean energy is safer, cheaper, and creates more jobs.

National monuments protect significant natural, cultural or scientific features for public benefit now and for future generations.  Commercial use of public lands costs the taxpayer without providing sufficient benefit, amounting to an enormous taxpayer subsidy to some of the richest corporations in the world.  Giving over more of our public lands for this purpose is not to the economic benefit of the American taxpayer—to say nothing of the cost of lost ecosystem services, and recreational, environmental, cultural, and scientific resources. 

Communities in the vicinity of National Monuments benefit from the tourism, outdoor recreation, and quality of life associated with healthy and protected public lands and waters. The Department of Interior would be hard-pressed to shrink, eliminate, or alter national monuments without undermining the very cultural and natural resources they seek to protect.

Please protect this National Monument. I am firmly opposed to any effort to revoke or diminish protections it, and I urge you to support our public lands and waters and recommend that our current national monuments remain protected.

Additional Script Inspiration

Modern Hiker

Nature Conservancy

Center for American Progress

Headwaters Economics

Indivisible WA Environment Network

Additional Information:

ACTION ALERT: Comment on EPA Rollbacks Daily Until 05/15/17

NOTE: This post will be updated with additional suggested comments until 5/15/17.  Please check back often.

Source: Indivisible Washington Environment Network and others

Description: As required by law, the EPA is calling for public comment on the planned rollback of environmental regulations. Comment early and often to show your support for regulations and programs that protect the environment.

Contact Information: Submit your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OA-2017-0190, here. Under PRIMARY DOCUMENTS, click on the COMMENT NOW! button. Add your comments in support of EPA. Click on YOUR REVIEW, and EDIT as necessary. Be sure to click YOUR RECEIPT before leaving the site. You’ll be able to view your comments as soon as you post.

Sample Scripts:

These scripts are designed to inform and are for inspiration and ideas!  Choose a topic that resonates with you and then edit the script to make it your own and add personal commentary.

Background: The Trump Administration and EPA Director Scott Pruitt have proposed draconian cuts to EPA’s budget and roll-back of science-based regulations that protect us, our families and our environment. EPA oversees implementation of the Clean Water Act; the Clean Air Act; regulation of Toxics, Hazardous Waste Management and Disposal; and Superfund Hazardous waste cleanups. EPA also administers grants for brownfields clean up, environmental research, and environmental restoration–including the Puget Sound National Estuary Program. In accordance with Executive Order 13777 (Enforcing the Regulatory Reform Agenda), EPA is seeking public comment on its evaluation of existing regulation. Comments must be received on or before May 15, 2017. We need to absolutely FLOOD THIS SITE with serious, well-thought-out comments.

Additional Information:

Recommended Actions for the Week of 20170403

Tell Governor Inslee We Support Him on the Clean Power Plan

Description: Thank Governor Jay Inslee for standing with other West Coast leaders from Alaska to California against the Trump adminstration’s executive order rolling back the Clean Power Plan.

 

Comment on the Anacortes Tesoro Xylene DEIS

Source: Re-Sources for Sustainable Communities

Description: Learn more about, submit a comment, and attend the public hearing on the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Tesoro Xylene Project.  

 

Call 40th District Reps to Advance Solar Bill

Source: Re-Sources for Sustainable Communities

Description: Call finance committee chair Kris Lytton and bill sponsor Jeff Morris to tell them to push the HB 1048 (solar bill) forward.

 

 

Oil Transportation Safety Act

Description: Call your representatives today to tell them this is an important issue and urge them to vote YES on oil transportation safety.

BackgroundOn Thursday, March 30th, the oil transportation bill (HB 1611) passed out of the House finance committee. Learn more about the bill.

Find your legislator and view the talking points below.

40th District
Senator Kevin Ranker (360) 786-7678
Representative Kristine Lytton (360) 786-7800
Representative Jeff R. Morris (360) 786-7970
42nd District
Senator Doug Ericksen (360) 786-7682
Representative Luane Van Werven (360) 786-7980
Representative Vincent Buys (360) 786-7854
Contacting your legislators by phone is by far the most productive and impactful form of communication. Read more in the New York Times article “Here’s why you should call, not email, your legislators.”
Suggested Script: Hello my name is _________ and I am a constituent of the ___ legislative district.
I am concerned about the ongoing threat that oil trains, pipelines, and tankers pose to my community and our waterways. 
The Oil Transportation Safety Act (HB 1611) is a commonsense approach to strengthening our prevention, response and preparedness program. Let’s not wait for a spill or other disaster to happen to take action. 
I urge Representative __________ to vote YES on HB 1611 and protect all of Washington from crude oil transport. Thank you.

National Level Actions

Take Action to Save the Institute of Museum and Library Services

Source: Everyday Advocacy

Description: Call your MoCs of to help ensure that the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is saved from federal budget cuts.

Background: As you may have seen, the White House budget that was released on Thursday, March 16, calls for eliminating the Institute of Museum & Library Services (IMLS), the only federal agency charged with providing support to our nation’s hundreds of thousands of libraries and museums.

ALA and ALSC seek your help to ensure that IMLS is saved, because without strong, well-supported libraries, our children and families will not have the resources and support they need to succeed in school and prepare for college, careers, and life.

ALSC leadership and the Advocacy and Legislation Committee are working on this issue with ALA and will be preparing additional information for ALSC members, but here is what you can do right now:

1. Start calling and emailing!
Go to http://cqrcengage.com/ala/home to begin making calls or to email to #SaveIMLS.

2. Call or email your Members of Congress.
Ask them to publicly oppose wiping out IMLS, and ask them to commit to fighting for federal library funding. You can find talking points and an email template on the Action Center and at the menu links below:

Call Your Congress Members

Email Your Congress Members

Use ALA Talking Points

3. Share your library’s IMLS story on social media using #SaveIMLS.
Tell us how IMLS funding supports your local community. If you aren’t sure which IMLS grants your library has received, you can check the searchable database on the IMLS website.

4. Sign up to receive ALA’s action alerts.
We will let you know when and how to take action and send you the talking points and background information.

5. Register to participate in National Library Legislative Day on May 1-2, either in Washington, DC, or online.

6. Share this information widely!
Don’t underestimate the power of collective voice. Share this information widely with colleagues, friends, and other advocates so they can help, too.

More information, along with talking points and scripts, will be forthcoming from the ALA Washington Office, particularly as it pertains to the upcoming advocacy campaign around “Dear Appropriator” letters.

Contact Information:

  • Senator Patty Murray, WA (206) 553-5545, DC (202) 224-2621
  • Senator Maria Cantwell, WA (206) 220-6400, DC (202) 224-3441
  • Congressman Rick Larsen (WA 2nd Legislative District), WA 360-733-4500, DC (202) 225-2605
  • Congresswoman Suzan DelBene (WA 1st Legislative District), WA (360) 416-7879, DC

Take a Stand Against Two New Proposed Bills to Sell-off Public Lands

Description: Call your MoCs and and tell them the federal budget must not include the proposal to give away public lands.

 

Background: The push to make it easier to transfer public lands into the private sector continues. House Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop (R-Utah) wants $50 million in the proposed federal budget to offset any costs resulting from transferring federal lands to states and localities.

We can tell members of Congress who are key to the federal budget process—especially Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, and Rep. Ken Calvert, the chairman of the House Interior Appropriations Subcommittee—that Rep. Bishop’s $50M budget proposal is not an acceptable use of taxpayer money.

Also, other proposals have been introduced by Nevada Rep. Mark Amodei and Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake to seize and sell public lands. Click here to read more about their proposal.

Contact Information:

  • Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, (202) 225-5034
  • Rep. Ken Calvert, (202) 225-1986
  • Senator Patty Murray, WA (206) 553-5545, DC (202) 224-2621
  • Senator Maria Cantwell, WA (206) 220-6400, DC (202) 224-3441
  • Congressman Rick Larsen (WA 2nd Legislative District), WA 360-733-4500, DC (202) 225-2605
  • Congresswoman Suzan DelBene (WA 1st Legislative District), WA (360) 416-7879, DC (202) 225-6311

From the Calendar

All week: Stand and Resist Exhibition
A ten-day exhibit of visual arts and one evening of live performances, showcasing local and regional artists who are exploring the intertwined issues of threats to the Salish Sea, climate change, and alternative futures.

Mondays from 11:30a.m.-1:30p.m.: Attend a vigil hosted by C2C every Monday in front of City Hall. Show the powers that be that you stand by our undocumented workers and anyone else running afoul of ICE. Let the officials know it’s not alright to tear families apart!

Monday, April 3, 2017 from 5:00-7:30p.m.: Pull Together: Salish Sea Stands Against Kinder Morgan.  WWU Communications Lawn. 

Monday, April 3, 2017 from 7:30-8:30p.m.: April Clean Energy Activist Meeting, hosted by Re-Sources for Sustainable Communities. WWU Communications Facility, Room 110. 

Tuesday April 4, 2017 from 6:00-7:00p.m.: Rep Vincent Buys and Rep Luanne Van Werven telephone town hall.

Saturday, April 8, 2017: Locust Beach Cleanup and Drum Circle

Sunday, April 9, 2017: Activist Training

Recommended Local Actions for the Week of 20170327

Support State Funding of Environmental Programs

Source: Nature Conservancy in Washington

Description: Contact your legislators to ask them to adequately fund environmental programs, especially in light of proposed cuts to federal funding. (Also, please see Contact State Legislators About the Republican Senate Budget Proposal.)

Background: On 3/21, the state Senate released their operating budget proposal, which included cuts to Puget Sound recovery, habitat restoration, and salmon recovery and no funding for climate action through the Clean Air Rule.  Since the 2007-2008 recession, our state’s investments in protecting clean air, clean water, and healthy natural resources have shrunk from 1.6% of our state’s general fund to 0.7%.  Conserving our state and national resources is not a partisan issue and it is not optional. Nature is essential to our well-being, and it offers solutions to some of the greatest economic and security challenges we face.

Contact Information: Contact your legislators to let them know you care about our natural resources.

Governor Jay Inslee, 360-902-4111, TTY/TDD call 711 or 1-800-833-6388
http://www.governor.wa.gov/contact/contact/send-gov-inslee-e-message

42nd District
Senator Doug Ericksen, (360) 786 – 7682, Doug.Ericksen@leg.wa.gov
Representative Luane Van Werven, (360) 786 – 7980, Luanne.VanWerven@leg.wa.gov
Representative Vincent Buys, (360) 786 – 7854, Vincent.Buys@leg.wa.gov

40th District
Senator Kevin Ranker, (360) 786 – 7678, Kevin.Ranker@leg.wa.gov
Representative Kristine Lytton, (360) 786 – 7800, Kristine.Lytton@leg.wa.gov
Representative Jeff R. Morris, (360) 786 – 7970, Jeff.Morris@leg.wa.gov

Suggested Script: My name is [insert name], and I am a resident of [insert city or County] in the [insert legislative district #] district.  I am writing/calling to ask for the following:

  • Hold the line: No more reductions to natural resource agencies that have already borne the brunt of post-recession cuts in our state’s operating budget.
  • Take action to pass smart carbon pricing policy that protects our natural resources and works for all of Washington. Until that happens, we must continue to fund existing policies like the Clean Air Rule to drive down carbon emissions to protect our communities.
  • Use the Capital Budget, set to be released next week, to make bold investments in Puget Sound and coastal restoration, cleanup of polluted stormwater runoff, forest health and wildfire risk reduction, salmon recovery, recreation and public land.

Additional Information: Click here for the Nature Conservancy action alert.  See Seattle Times articles about proposed federal and state environmental funding cuts.  The website with full Senate and House Budget and Funding Proposals is here.

Contact State Legislators About the Republican Senate Budget Proposal

Source: Washington’s Paramount Duty

Description: Contact Governor Inslee and your legislators by phone or email to express your concerns about the proposed Republican budget. (Also, please see Support State Funding of Environmental Programs.)

Background: Article from the Seattle Times, click here. Article from U.S. News, click here. Article from King 5, click here. And Crosscut.

Contact Information: 

Governor Jay Inslee, 360-902-4111, TTY/TDD call 711 or 1-800-833-6388
http://www.governor.wa.gov/contact/contact/send-gov-inslee-e-message

42nd District
Senator Doug Ericksen, (360) 786 – 7682, Doug.Ericksen@leg.wa.gov
Representative Luane Van Werven, (360) 786 – 7980, Luanne.VanWerven@leg.wa.gov
Representative Vincent Buys, (360) 786 – 7854, Vincent.Buys@leg.wa.gov

40th District
Senator Kevin Ranker, (360) 786 – 7678, Kevin.Ranker@leg.wa.gov
Representative Kristine Lytton, (360) 786 – 7800, Kristine.Lytton@leg.wa.gov
Representative Jeff R. Morris, (360) 786 – 7970, Jeff.Morris@leg.wa.gov

Suggested Script:

Hi [ LEGISLATOR NAME ],

I’m a parent/constituent in the [ LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT ] District. I am contacting you because I am deeply concerned by the Senate Republican budget proposal. This proposal balances the budget on the backs of low-income communities, with huge cuts to vital programs that serve our most vulnerable communities. And it doesn’t even fully fund our public schools! Nor does it require massively wealthy companies and individuals to pay their fair share towards educating Washington’s children. I am asking you to reject the Republican budget. Instead, I am asking you to support new, sustainable revenue for fully funding public education, that does not take away from vital state services and instead asks wealthiest Washingtonians to pay their fair share.

[ YOUR NAME ]

Thank Whatcom County Council for Extending Moratorium

Description: Thank Whatcom County Council for extending the moratorium on unrefined fossil fuel export projects.

Background: At their 3/21/17 meeting, County Council voted 6-1 for ordinance 2017-011, “imposing an interim moratorium on the acceptance and processing of applications and permits for new or expanded facilities in the Cherry Point Urban Growth Area, the primary purpose of which would be the shipment of unrefined fossil fuels not to be processed at Cherry Point.”

Contact Information:  Send an email to council@co.whatcom.wa.us or click here for contact information of individual County Council members.

Suggested Script:  Thank you so much for supporting the moratorium on unrefined fossil fuel export projects in Cherry Point Urban Growth Area.  Your efforts to protect our community’s health and safety, farms, fisheries and natural resources from the dangers of fossil fuel shipments by rail, pipeline and marine vessel are so appreciated!!

 

Protect Blanchard Mountain

Source: Conservation Northwest

Description: Contact the Governor, your legislators, and chairs of the House Capital Budget and Senate Ways & Means committees to ask them to fully fund the effort to protect the Blanchard State Forest core from logging.

Background: Encompassing Blanchard Mountain and Oyster Dome, Blanchard State Forest is a hugely popular recreation area visited by tens of thousands of people from across the Puget Sound region each year. This cherished area could be clearcut this summer if the state legislature doesn’t act!  n 2007 an agreement was reached to protect the core of Blanchard State Forest from logging. But $7.7 million in funding is still needed, and the 2017 legislative session is the last chance to secure full funding before logging will begin.

Contact Information: Please use this automated comment form to ask legislators and the Governor to fully fund the agreement before it’s too late!

For more information, including additional actions you can take to save Blanchard Mountain, click here.

 

Protect the Methow Headwaters (Deadline: 3/30)

Source: Conservation Northwest

Description: Tell BLM to say No to industrial mining in the Methow Valley.

Background: The Methow Valley in north-central Washington is celebrated for its extraordinary natural diversity, clean water, and rural culture, and a resilient economy fueled by outdoor recreation, scenic tourism, agriculture, and fish and wildlife.  The Methow Headwaters are threatened by a proposed large-scale industrial mine.  In December 2016, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced that it is considering a 20-year mineral withdrawal that would prevent new mining developments on 340,000 acres of Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in the Methow Headwaters to allow time for Congress to secure permanent protection through the Methow Headwaters Protection Act of 2017, introduced.  The BLM is accepting public comments on the Methow mining withdrawal until March 30, 2017.

Contact Information: Please use this automated comment form to convey your support for the Methow Headwaters mineral withdrawal by March 30.

For the full Conservation Northwest action alert, click here.  For the Methow Headwaters campaign page, click here.  The Methow Conservancy has compiled a list of resources on the issue here.

 

Watch Video on Washington’s Tax Code

Description: Watch the video “Washington’s Upside Down Tax Code, Explained.”

Background: A huge obstacle in the fight to fully fund public education, as well as fund many other social service issues/agencies, is to rectify Washington State’s regressive tax system. This video explains the problem well, click here.

 

Comment on Bill on Gender Segregated Bathrooms

Contact: Use the comment form: http://app.leg.wa.gov/billsummary?BillNumber=1011&Year=2017

Background: HB 1011, co-sponsored by our very own Vincent Buys, says that the state civil rights act does not prevent gender segregation in bathrooms.  It is unclear to me how this would be enforced.  And more importantly, it conflates the unrelated issues of transgendered people using bathrooms with that of dangerous people using bathrooms.  Let’s just get to the point already and ban dangerous people from using bathrooms!

 

Attend the Stand and Resist Exhibition

Source: Sylvia Center

Description: Attend the Stand and Resist Exhibition between Wednesday, March 29th to Friday, April 7th at the Studio Theater at Sylvia Center for the Arts, 205 Prospect St., Bellingham, WA 98225.

Background: A ten-day exhibit of visual arts and one evening of live performances, showcasing local and regional artists who are exploring the intertwined issues of threats to the Salish Sea, climate change, and alternative futures. Click here for more information.

 

National Level Actions

Call MoCs in Support of Internet Privacy

Source: Electronic Frontier Foundation

Description: Call your MoCs

Contact: Call (415) 360-0555 on MONDAY and you’ll be connected to your member of Congress.

Background: Facebook Event: “We are one vote away from a world where your ISP can track your every move online and sell that information to the highest bidder. Before the House votes on Tuesday, call your lawmakers and tell them to protect federal online privacy rules.”

Additional Info: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/23/technology/congress-moves-to-strike-internet-privacy-rules-from-obama-era.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/26/technology/internet-privacy-state-legislation-illinois.html

Recommended local actions for the week of 20170320

Community Food Justice Planning Meeting

Birchwood & Alderwood Residents:  Attend community meeting about Albertson’s closure & food justice – solutions for the community by the community.    Friday, March 24, 7-8:30 pm.  Shuksan Middle School   Cafeteria.  Sponsors:  Bellingham Racial Justice Coalition, Community to Community Development, & Jobs with Justice.  Contact: tinamckim@yahoo.com

State Legislation Workshop with NARAL-Pro-Choice Washington

Free workshop this Saturday from 2-4 at Village Books. The workshop will consist of a bit of a crash course on how legislation works at the state and local level, and then we’ll discuss proven strategies on how to affect real political change, and give everyone an inside look at NARAL Pro-Choice Washington’s political strategy for this legislative session. This workshop is interactive, so we’ll have some group exercises and also invite folks to talk about their own experiences as activists whether you marched in January, wrote letters, attended a rally or called your lawmakers! Registration

Urgent Call to Action: Protect Cherry Point!

If you haven’t yet done so, please take action!!  See our earlier post for contact information and suggested scripts.

  • Oppose Senator Ericksen’s efforts to reverse the order that removed the 45-acre pier-sized cutout from the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve boundary.
    • MONDAY, 3/20: Call Senate Committee members!!
    • TUESDAY, 3/21: If you can, attend the public hearing in Olympia at 10am and wear red.
  • Ask Whatcom County Council to extend the moratorium on unrefined fossil fuel export projects and strengthen Comprehensive Plan policies for Cherry Point.
    • BY TUESDAY, 3/21: Submit comment via email before the public hearing.
    • TUESDAY, 3/21: Attend the Whatcom County Council public hearing at 7pm and wear red.

 

Oppose SB 5864 Banning Homelessness

This bill is scheduled for executive session TODAY (Monday, March 20th) in the Senate Committee on Ways & Means at 3:30pm.  Call your senator to oppose.

Kevin Ranker (360) 786 – 7678
Doug Ericksen (360) 786 – 7682

Bill tracking
Live video of the committee meeting

 

Call Rick Larsen to co-sponsor a Resolution of Inquiry on Trump’s tax returns.

Suzan DelBele is already a co-sponsor.

Information from Indivisible Guide
Bill information
Contact information for Rick Larsen

 

From the Calendar

Friday 24 March, 12pm – 1pm, How Children’s Literature Inspires Bold Conversations, Bellingham Public Library – Central Branch, 210 Central Ave, Bellingham

Recommended Local Actions for the Week of 20170313

DON’T FORGET: ACT BY TUESDAY!  Whatcom Conservation District election, North Cascades Grizzly Restoration. 

WCD ELECTION: Drop off your ballot or vote in person (at WCD’s office at 6975 Hannegan Road, Lynden. Polls will be open between 9:00 am and 6:00 pm) for District Board Supervisor by Tuesday 3/14 at 6pm the Whatcom Conservation District Board Supervisor election.  In case you missed our post about the candidates, we have more information here.

GRIZZLY BEARS: Have you had a chance to submit written comment to support the Draft Grizzly Bear Restoration Plan/Environmental Impact Statement Alternative C?  Public comment ends Tuesday.  More information from an earlier post here.

 

CARBON TAX: Support Clean Energy by Creating a Carbon Tax (HB 1646/SB 5509)

**From Alliance for Jobs and Clean Energy, Washington Environmental Council, Sierra Club (edited).  Despite a federal government that refuses to acknowledge climate change, Washington state can and must step up as a leader and a beacon of hope for equitable climate policy.  How can you help?

 

PUGET SOUND: Stand Up for Puget Sound

Alarmed at the news that the Trump administration plans to dramatically cut funding for Puget Sound protection and restoration?  The Washington Environmental Council has identified five ways to stand up for Puget Sound.  We’d like to highlight and elaborate on just two of those:

  • Talk to your state legislators about why we must adequately fund Puget Sound protection and recovery at the state level. State support for natural resources programs as a whole and Puget Sound protections specifically has declined dramatically over the past several years.
    • Contact your legislators offices directly.
    • Legislature Hotline: 1-800-562-6000
    • Suggested script: I am a constituent of [insert legislator name], and now more than ever, it is important that we take action to protect and restore Puget Sound and the Salish Sea.  Please support funding for important Puget Sound Protection and Restoration programs, including toxic cleanup and prevention (Support HB1663/SB5501), sound floodplain management (“Floodplains by Design” program), and habitat protection and restoration (“Puget Sound Recovery and Acquisition Fund”).
    • Thank the Congressional Puget Sound caucus for championing our region at the national level. They have their work cut out for them, and saying “thank you” is important. Click here to remind them that you have their backs.

FAIR CHANCE: Call/Comment: People who have served their time deserve a fair chance.

The Fair Chance Act (Substitute House Bill (SHB) 1298), which would prevent employers from asking about arrests or convictions until after an employer has determined that the applicant is qualified for the position, was voted out of the House and is now in the Senate committee on Commerce, Labor and Sports.

Suggested comment:
“One of the biggest problems facing people convicted of a crime is “the box.” Job applicants who answer that they’ve been convicted of a crime, even something rather minimal, are less likely to get hired.  People who have served their time deserve a fair chance.  Please vote for SHB 1298″.

 

SAVE THE DATE!  3/21, 7pm: Whatcom County Council public hearing on Cherry Point moratorium and Comp Plan Amendments.

**From ReSources for Sustainable Communities.  Come speak out in support of extending the moratorium on fossil fuel exports and strengthening policies in the Comprehensive Plan protecting Cherry Point.  See here to RSVP and for more information.

 

From the Calendar

15 March 2017.  Eric Hirst to speak on “Water in Whatcom County, and Why We should Be Concerned”, 7-8:30pm, Carl Cozier School, 1330 Lincoln St., Bellingham.

 

Whatcom Conservation District Board Supervisor Election: Candidate Information

Thank you for your interest in the Whatcom Conservation District Board Supervisor Election!  We contacted the three candidates and asked them to respond to the following questions:

  1. What background, experience, and skills do you bring to support the Whatcom Conservation District in its mission to assist land managers with their conservation choices?
  2. What do you think are the most pressing challenges facing farmers in their stewardship choices and how will you work with the District to address those challenges?
  3. What do you think are the best approaches to protecting and restoring habitat, instream flows and water quality for salmon, steelhead, shellfish, and other organisms?
  4. Describe your connections with the agricultural community in Whatcom County and how you will use those connections to support the District in their outreach efforts.
  5. What will be your top three priorities if elected?

Two candidates answered the call, and their responses are provided in their entirety below.  While we shall not be endorsing a candidate, we hope that these responses and the additional information linked below will inform your voting.  You may vote in person at the District’s office at 6975 Hannegan Road, Lynden, on 3/14/17, 9 am-6 pm.  If you received a ballot, you may deliver it to the District’s office by 6pm on election day, or mail it so it will be postmarked on day of election or sooner. Good luck to you!

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS (Alphabetical by Last Name)

Heather Christianson

1. What background, experience, and skills do you bring to support the Whatcom Conservation District in its mission to assist land managers with their conservation choices?

Most of the work of the Whatcom Conservation District is accomplished through Federal and State grants. I have extensive knowledge in grant management having worked in both grantmaking and grant requesting organizations. I understand the importance of good grant management from both sides, and the necessity for thorough proposal reviews and measurable outcomes reporting to ensure proper and effective use of funding. I will help the Conservation District continue to work toward accomplishing their mission, and search for additional sources of revenue and programs to expand their work toward achieving their vision of a Whatcom County with healthy soils, water and air.

In addition, I have an in-depth understanding of board services. I currently serve on the Executive Board of the Whatcom County Democrats and chair the Finance Committee. I have also worked with many non-profit boards in a professional capacity. I strongly believe in the role of a board member as an advocate for the organization and its constituents. In that capacity, I believe it is important to help spread the message of the organization to networks beyond their reach. I have strong experience in advocacy having volunteered with local non-profits like Community to Community and with my union, Public School Employees. Through the role of advocate in the community, I will also be an active listener to the community, and will bring those thoughts to the table as a representative of this community in conservations strategies for a positive impact on Whatcom County’s water systems, natural resources, and wildlife habitats.

I also bring a wealth of diverse experience in event management from planning fundraisers to poetry slams to youth soccer tournaments, in program planning and implementation under funding constraints, in bridge-building between diverse communities, and in financial oversite and guidance. If elected to the Board of Supervisors, I will be able to offer my expertise to the staff for their various event and program work.

2.  What do you think are the most pressing challenges facing farmers in their stewardship choices and how will you work with the District to address those challenges?

The Whatcom Conservation District is in a unique position to be a partner with farmers in helping with stewardship choices. They offer cost-share programs that encourage farmers to adopt conservation strategies. These cost-sharing and financial assistance programs help tackle the very first barrier facing farmers, which is how to implement conservation strategies without having a negative impact on an often unreliable bottom line. Many factors have an influence on yearly profits for farmers and planning for lean years can be a top priority over implementing conservation programs. With the District’s funding, these financial barriers are mitigated to encourage farmer participation. In addition, finding the time to develop and implement these programs can be challenging. With the District’s staff of experts available to help farmers with their plans, the District is able to help overcome that challenge as well. As a non-regulatory entity, farmers can feel comfortable approaching the District for their services. And through the District’s outreach efforts, such as the Small Farmer Expo and the Farm Speaker Series, the District takes every opportunity to educate farmers on available conservation programs and provide financial incentives to implement those strategies. If elected, I will advocate for the continuation of these programs as well as search for further opportunities to expand the District’s impact in Whatcom County.

3.  What do you think are the best approaches to protecting and restoring habitat, instream flows and water quality for salmon, steelhead, shellfish, and other organisms?

There are many approaches to protecting and restoring habitat, instream flows and water quality for salmon, steelhead, shellfish and other organisms. These programs include watershed management, water quality protection and restoration, estuary and floodplain habitat restoration, shoreline protection, efficient irrigation systems, proper manure storage facilities, streambank restoration, manure application risk management systems, and many more. The Whatcom Conservation District, as well as the Washington State Conservation Commission, offer several programs to assist land managers in their conservation strategies to help in these efforts. The best approaches are the ones that land owners are willing to follow through with and opt-in to be part of the solution. Our district offers expertise, planning assistance and cost sharing programs that include fish barrier removal, livestock waste management, streambank stabilization, and salmon habitat conservation. Often these programs aren’t sought out until a problem has been identified. Through my service on the board, I will help the District to motivate land owners and land managers to be proactive in utilizing these programs throughout Whatcom County. The best approaches involve partnerships so that many stakeholders are involved and help keep each other accountable in our roles to protect and improve our natural resources. Our district has been a strong partner in this process, including winning an Environmental Excellence Award last November. Unfortunately, I believe we have reached a critical juncture in which not one strategy will be the best solution. That is why I will be an advocate for expanding the programs and impact of the Conservation District. While their current programs and partnerships have had a positive impact on our water systems, I don’t believe we can allow for the status quo to continue. Significant progress needs to be made now before the damage is too great to be restored or recovered.

4. Describe your connections with the agricultural community in Whatcom County and how you will use those connections to support the District in their outreach efforts.

I live in the small farmhouse my grandfather built with his father in 1933, and where I spent most afternoons working with my grandparents on their farm. Currently, we harvest an annual organic hay crop on our farmlands which is used as feed by various farmers in our community. This deeply personal and historical connection to Whatcom County contributes to my dedication to preserving what we value most about living in such a beautiful, community-minded area. The economic interests of our farmers are vital to our community’s health, as are the environmental conservation measures that help preserve what we love about our County. The outreach efforts of the District are important in educating farmers, as well as the general public, in what efforts we can all make to have a positive impact on the health of our water systems, natural resources, and wildlife habitats. While it is the farming community that is most significantly served by the District, the District offers programs for all land owners and land managers in Whatcom County, from in-school educational programs to land owner programs such as soil testing and firewise programs. I have comprehensive experience in outreach efforts and strategies through other nonprofit work and if elected, will bring that experience to the Board of Supervisors as an active member in our community.

5. What will be your top three priorities if elected?

Among my priorities, if elected, will include being a progressive voice for Whatcom County on the Conservation Board. I will be an advocate for our environment and for the best conservation practices that will have a significant impact on protecting and restoring our natural resources. Our farming economy is vital to our overall economy, but I will bring an open mind and fresh perspective for new ideas in the conservation field. A top priority will be to advocate for the best programs that utilize taxpayer dollars to have the highest impact on conservation in Whatcom County. For example, and another priority, will be the Conservation District’s role in water quantity for Whatcom County. While the District’s long ranch plan includes working to encourage widespread adoption of water conservation practices on working farms and ranches, I believe these practices will be essential in tackling Whatcom County’s ongoing and growing issue of water quantity. I will advocate that the District prioritize these programs, many of which are available through the Washington State Conservation Commission’s water conservation programs such as the Irrigation Efficiencies Grant Program which offers financial incentives for upgrading to more efficient, water-saving irrigation systems. This will be essential to ensuring available water for all users in the system as well as protecting salmon habitats in our river. I will also prioritize advocating for the District to explore innovative approaches to conservation. I appreciate the District’s lagoon pasteurization pilot project, which makes potable water from liquid manure, and I look forward to further exploring the viability of such programs for Whatcom County. If elected to the Board of Supervisors, I will bring an eager energy to exploring new programs and creative solutions for farmers and land managers in their conservation strategies. It is imperative that we make significant strides now to protect and restore the quality of our water systems, natural resources, and wildlife habitats, without having a detrimental impact on the viability or economic prosperity of our important farming community.

Suzzi Snydar

1.What background, experience, and skills do you bring to support the Whatcom Conservation District in its mission to assist land managers with their conservation choices?

As a woman involved actively in the Agriculture Community for over 20 years, I have hands on knowledge of farming the land as well as working closely with the Conservation District through the services they provide land owners. I have found it a productive ,amicable working relationship . The staff at the Conservation District are extremely knowledgeable in their area of expertise. I work well with others and have been involved in Whatcom County Farm Bureau as well as the Portage Bay Partnership. As the “stewardship” and “Manure Manager” for our family farm I have worked closely with the Conservation District , Department of Ecology and USDA. I am an Advocate for the work they do for our community. I have volunteered with countless groups and service organizations throughout the years . I have managed several businesses through out the years , and have overseen large groups of employees and volunteers .

2.What do you think are the most pressing challenges facing farmers in their stewardship choices and how will you work with the District to address those challenges? 

Ask three producers in the Agriculture community and you will get three different answers. For our farm I would Say the perpetual hoop jumping . Let me explain my answer in general terms . Four years ago (approximately) we were working towards a solution of an issue we had on our farm . Conservation District was spearheading the efforts and going through the process of the solution coming to fruition on our farm. The Conservation District Employees had a magnificent solution . Many government agencies were on board and had given their approval and support of the solution. Conservation District, Dept. of Ecology, USDA, Whatcom County. And then after many hours invested in getting to this solution — A single Government Agency says — NO. A singular Agency had the ability to completely keep the solution from being put into place.

So challenging to be part of the process working towards a great solution and have it all be for naught. The layers and layers of regulations across many different agencies that in many industries is repetitive and redundant. It is important that land owners understand that the Conservation District is there for them. They are effective and have access to great tools and clear science .

Late this spring we will begin a large project on our farm that the Conservation District , USDA and Ecology have all been part of . We are excited to break ground and see their hard work and planning on a project come to life.

3.What do you think are the best approaches to protecting and restoring habitat, instream flows and water quality for salmon, steelhead, shellfish, and other organisms?  

It is not my job to define these practices independently . As I am sure you are aware this is a complex and complicated issue that has been  tweaked by special interest groups and there is  significant misinformation in the press on these issues.  As a supervisor  I see my position as one  to allow the paid staff for the District to utilize their knowledge in these practices as they identify solutions and practices to be put into place by land owners. In my role as a Supervisor I will support their efforts ,ask questions ,and coordinate assistance as needed from other Agency’s and groups.

4. Describe your connections with the agricultural community in Whatcom County and how you will use those connections to support the District in their outreach efforts.

As a vocal advocate for Agriculture , it is my desire to raise awareness to land owners of the voluntary,incentive -based programs available that increase their stewardship of their land and natural resources. Our family farm is a signer and partner in the Portage Bay Partnership, this alone models that working together towards resolutions we can accomplish solutions for many . We are involved in Custom Harvesting forage for many farmers in our county. This puts me in contact with many farmers on a continual basis. As a rural land owner I and business owner I frequently interact with citizens who own parcels of land that could be served by conservation district if they needed services or advice on how to steward their land.

5. What will be your top three priorities if elected?

  • Advocate for Best Management Practices for our County. We in Whatcom County have been blessed with beautiful plentiful resources , that provide food, fiber and energy, It is my desire to protect their contributions to the local economy.
  • Encourage and work toward no net loss of farm land in Whatcom County.
  • BE a positive voice for the work that the Conservation District does.

 

Recommended Local Actions for the Week of 20170306

Act by Tuesday, 3/7! Support Whatcom County Council interim ordinance and state legislation responding to Hirst decision

**Source: RE Sources for Sustainable Communities (edited)**

In the Hirst decision, the Court ruled that Whatcom County, in issuing building permits with permit-exempt wells as water source, failed to comply with GMA requirements in protecting water resources.  Whatcom County Council has scheduled a special presentation on the issue at their 3/7 meeting, where they will show a 20-minute video, ask questions of state and local water experts, and hold a public hearing on a proposed interim ordinance.  Click for more information on the meeting and additional background information.  We also hosted an Ask-Me-Anything on Facebook on this issue last week.

  • Ask Whatcom County Council to renew the interim ordinance (AB2016-309D) that limits use of exempt wells in the Nooksack basin for new development in order to be in compliance with the State Supreme Court and protect senior water rights and stream flows.
  • Contact your legislators to support HB 1918 and oppose SB 5239!
    • Contact your legislators offices directly.
    • Submit comment online: HB1918 or SB5239.
    • Legislature Hotline: 1-800-562-6000
    • Suggested script:
    • Please support HB 1918, which allows people who were in the process of building homes when the Hirst decision was issued to resume development and use an exempt well. Counties must mitigate the use of those new wells within 5 years. This is common sense and will not undermine senior water right holders.
    • Please oppose SB 5239. New exempt wells that aren’t mitigated will further strain our limited water resources especially in the summer when everyone — people, farms, and fish — need it most. New exempt wells will be stealing water from other senior water right holders like farmers. The situation will only get worse with population growth.

 

ACT BY Tuesday, 3/7!  Support Whatcom County Council in Comprehensive Plan policies for Cherry Point, extending fossil fuel export moratorium

**Source: RE Sources for Sustainable Communities (edited)**

Although SSA Marine has withdrawn their 2011 county permits for a coal terminal at Cherry Point, Cherry Point remains a targeted route to export crude oil, tar sands, and fracked gas. In March 2017, the Whatcom County Council is working on updates to their Comprehensive Plan policies for Cherry Point. This is a huge turning point for the future of our community.  Join us in calling on the Whatcom County Council to take actions to protect the public by discouraging projects to bring more dangerous crude oil shipments through Whatcom County, Cherry Point, and the Salish Sea.  For more information, click here.

Send a comment to the Whatcom County Council by March 7th and encourage them to extend the temporary moratorium on permits for fossil fuel export projects.

  • Contact the Council by phone or email.
  • Talking points
    • As a [insert city] resident and citizen of Whatcom County, I implore you to act to the full extent of your power to protect our community’s health and safety, farms, fisheries and natural resources from the dangers of fossil fuel shipments by rail, pipeline and marine vessel. Cherry Point is a targeted route to export crude oil, tar sands, fracked gas, and propane from Canada, which would bring high risks of spills, leaks, explosions, pollution, traffic, a local tax burden, reduced property values, and the degradation of our quality of life.
    • I urge you to take the following actions, without delay:
      • Extend the temporary moratorium on permits for fossil fuel export projects until the Shoreline Master Plan is updated and until new development regulations are implemented. Additionally, please add a moratorium on applications for any modification of piers, docks, or wharfs in or adjacent to the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve.
      • Commence a legal study into Whatcom County’s powers to prevent future development for coal, oil, and gas exports.
      • Strengthen policies in the Comp Plan to prevent piecemeal upgrades for oil exports by requiring Magnuson Amendment review of all permits that involve handling petroleum; block any new proposals for shipping piers in the Cherry Point Aquatic Reserve; recognize Lummi Nation’s history and treaty-protected fishing rights; and complete a legal study by December 2017.
    • I support your work to protect the ecological and cultural significance of Cherry Point.

 

PROJECT NEIGHBORLY: Apply by 12 March

Whatcom Community Foundation is pairing people of diverse backgrounds for one-on-one dinners.  To be considered for the project:

  1. Take the PBS quiz (no personal information requested) and receive a score.
  2. Submit an application

 

HB 1611: Tell your legislators you care about protecting communities from crude oil

**Source: RE Sources for Sustainable Communities (edited)**

We are in the thick of the legislative session, and your legislators need to hear that you care about protecting your community from crude oil.  The Oil Transportation Safety Act (HB1611) needs additional support to move from committee and make its way to a full floor vote in the House. This is a commonsense bill that holds the oil industry accountable for the risks they pose to our communities and waterways.  For more information, click here.

Contact your legislators to let them know you support this bill and that it deserves a full vote on the House floor.

  • Suggested script: I am concerned about the ongoing threat that oil trains, pipelines, and tankers pose to my community and our waterways. The Oil Transportation Safety Act (HB 1611) is a commonsense approach to strengthening our prevention, response and preparedness program. Let’s not wait for a spill or other disaster to happen to take action. I urge you to vote YES on HB 1611 and protect all of Washington from crude oil transport. Thank you for considering my comments, and I look forward to your response.

 

From the Calendar

7 March 2017 – Whatcom County Council meeting.  Attend in person or attend our watch party.

14 March 2017 – Whatcom Conservation District ballot due – We sent questions to candidates and will share those responses as we receive them.

 

Recommended Local Actions for the Week of 20170227

Recommended Local Actions for the Week of 20170227

ACT TODAY: Support SB5501/HB1663 (Funding for Toxic Pollution Prevention and Cleanup)

Call or submit comment online to express your support for these important bills which will stabilize funding for preventing and controlling pollution and cleaning up toxic sites, including the Bellingham waterfront.

Funding to support toxics cleanup, as well as pollution prevention, in Washington state comes from a tax on hazardous substances – mostly petroleum products. With the drop in oil prices in recent years, there has been a significant shortfall in revenue to support cleanup. These bills will help stabilize funding by applying a modest surtax on hazardous substances when annual revenues fall below $160M.

  • Contact information
  • Suggested comment:

The voter-approved Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) has proven to be an effective means to clean up toxic waste sites, prevent toxic chemical pollution, and support communities to address toxics pollution threats. However, the state has lost an estimated $375 million in MTCA funding over the last three years, and the tax must be stabilized to keep Washington on track in reducing harmful pollution.

Thankfully, the legislature is considering HB 1663/SB 5501, which would:

  • Stabilize funding for cleaning up toxic sites, preventing and controlling pollution, and ensuring communities have a voice in reducing threats from toxic pollution.
  • Apply a modest and temporary surcharge on the state hazardous substance tax, which would generate an estimated $50 million over the next two years and help address a $70 million budget shortfall.
  • Allow for more predictability in the state budget process and provides reliability for local communities that depend on these dollars to improve public health and the environment.
  • Help maintain funding for critical state environmental programs that benefit all corners of the state.

I urge you to support HB 1663/SB 5501 so we can protect our communities from risks we face today and keep us safe for years to come. Thank you for considering my comments, and I look forward to your response.

Comment in Support of Extending Solar Incentives

Seen all the solar panels popping up on local roofs lately?  This phenomena is due largely to a three-pronged state/federal incentive program which provides tax credit, banking of excess production, and production payments which are much higher if you buy Washington-made equipment.  The state incentives that began several years ago will expire in June of 2020.  All along, the idea has been that legislators would revise the program based on experiences and then introduce new legislation to extend it with improvements.  Unfortunately, they have failed in at least a couple of attempts to do so, and now we are staring down the expiration of incentives in 3 years.  In my amateur reading, the new legislation steps down production payments, changes the requirements around community solar installations, removes the requirement of owning the building and land, changes the funding cap, and a few more administrative details.  

Contact information

Attend the Recall Hearing for Senator Doug Ericksen

Thursday, March 2nd at 8:30am, Whatcom County Superior Court.  We will provide further guidance later this week.  Please refer to our post on this for updates.

Thank Jay Inslee for Executive Order on Immigration

It’s that time of the week again, time to call Jay Inslee and say thanks.  Washington will not participate in civil immigration raids. Read about it in the Seattle Times and the Stranger.

https://www.facebook.com/WaStateGov/
https://twitter.com/GovInslee
360-902-4111

From the Calendar

Monday 27 Feb, 6pm, Candlelight vigil – Immigration enforcement

Monday 27 Feb, 7pm (but come at 6:15 for trading cards), Family Council Night at Bellingham City Council meeting

Saturday 4 March, 3-5pm, Riveters Collective Meeting and Social

SAVE THE DATE: 3/7/17, 6pm.  Whatcom County Council Special Presentation on the Hirst Decision.

In the Hirst decision, the Court ruled that Whatcom County, in issuing building permits with permit-exempt wells as water source, failed to comply with GMA requirements in protecting water resources.  Whatcom County Council has scheduled a special presentation on the issue at their 3/7 meeting, where they will show a 20-minute video, ask questions of state and local water experts, and hold a public hearing on a proposed interim ordinance.  More information here.

 

Recommended Local Actions for the Week of 20170213

Attend the Rally to Support Bellingham Sanctuary City TONIGHT

Monday 13 February 2017 5:45 – 7 at Bellingham City Hall
*This is a Riveters Collective event.*  Blue Group and Community to Community Development, local groups representing our undocumented neighbors, have asked Bellingham City Council to pass the Keep Bellingham Families Working Ordinance (more information, and read the ordinance).    The Council may is considering this vote.  We understand that there will be people demonstrating in opposition to the City making passing such an ordinance and we want to make sure the Council sees how much support there is for this action.  This is a family-friendly, peaceful event. Bring signs, noisemakers, musical instruments, and banners. Join the Facebook event for more information.

ACTION NEEDED BY TUESDAY, FEB 14: Request a ballot for the Whatcom Conservation District Board Election

The Whatcom Conservation District is holding an election for a Board member on March 14th.   Any Whatcom County resident that is a registered voter may vote in person or by mail, but mail-in ballots must be requested via this link by February 14th at 4pm.

Support HB1048 (Solar Incentives) and SB5501/HB1663 (Funding for Toxic Pollution Prevention and Cleanup)

Call or email your legislators to express your support for these important bills.

  • Contact information
    • Find your Representatives here.
    • Legislature Hotline: 1-800-562-6000.
    • Email addresses here.
  • Suggested script:
    • Hi, my name is [insert name] and I am a constituent of the [insert district #] legislative district. 
    • Please support HB 1048, which will update the state’s solar program to make it more effective and sustainable.  Expanding solar power use greatly benefits Washington’s economy, environment, and energy security.
    • Please also support companion bills SB5501 and HB1663, which add a modest surcharge to the current hazardous substance tax to provide more stable and timely funding for prevention and cleanup of toxic pollution, including a number of contaminated sites in Bellingham Bay.  
  • More information
    • HB1048: “Promoting a sustainable, local renewable energy industry through modifying renewable energy system tax incentives and providing guidance for renewable energy system component recycling”
    • SB5501/HB1663 “Concerning imposing a surtax on the possession of hazardous substances”

Comment in support of Blanchard/Oyster Dome Preservation

**From Conservation Northwest (edited): Encompassing Blanchard Mountain and Oyster Dome, Blanchard State Forest is a hugely popular recreation area visited by tens of thousands of people from across the Puget Sound region each year. This cherished area could be clearcut this summer if the state legislature doesn’t act!  In 2007 an agreement was reached to protect the core of Blanchard State Forest from logging. But $7.7 million in funding is still needed, and the 2017 legislative session is the last chance to secure full funding before logging will begin.  Please use this automated comment form to ask your state legislators and the Governor to fully fund the agreement before it’s too late!  See automated comment form.  More information here.

Portage Bay Partnership

  1. Buy milk/cheese/ice cream from Edaleen Dairy and Twin Brook Farms
  2. Follow the Portage Bay Partnership on Facebook
  3. Send messages of gratitude to Edaleen Dairy and Twin Brook Creamery.
    Riveters Collective is a big fan of the Portage Bay Partnership.  This week two dairies stepped forward to leadership roles in the partnership and we want them to know we are grateful.
    Background: If you are not already a fan of this collaborative and visionary partnership between the Lummi Nation and local dairy farms, read more here: Seattle Times article with beautiful photos.

Civics Book Club

Organized by Jae Heidenreich.  Book selections will improve our understanding of civics and are likely to revolve around the topics of activism, empathy and affairs of state. First book: Rebecca Solnit’s “The Case for Hope.” Well meet for the first time on 3/21 at 6:30 pm & decide then what dates work best going forward. Facebook message Jae to join.

Follow Riveters Collective on Twitter

And especially re-tweet our efforts on holding Senator Ericksen accountable.

From the Calendar

Monday 13 February 2017 5:45 – 7 Rally to Support Bellingham Sanctuary City at Bellingham City Hall

Monday 13 Feb, 12:30pm, Salish Sea Stands on Capitol Hill Day https://www.facebook.com/events/372287713151983/

Monday 13 Feb, 6:30pm, February Clean Energy Activist Meeting at ReSources. https://www.facebook.com/events/1909863462565875/

Monday 16 Feb, 5:30-8pm, Phone bank to rally support for SB5501/HB1663 (Increased funding for Toxic Pollution Prevention and Cleanup of Toxic Pollution) at ReSources.  RSVP to Emily at wecprotects.org.

Monday 20 Feb, 10am, Equity Rally at State Capitol.  https://wecprotects.org/events/equity-rally/