Recommended Actions for the Week of 20170529

***CLICK ON THE TOPIC HEADER TO EXPAND THE DETAILS***

Local Level Actions

National Level Actions / Other

From the Calendar

Every Monday: Attend a vigil hosted by C2C between 11:30a.m.-1:30p.m. This week will be a bit different because City Hall will be closed for Memorial Day. We will meet at City Hall like normal and then march over to the Police Station. Show the powers that be that you stand by our undocumented workers and anyone else running afoul of ICE. Let the officials know it’s not alright to tear families apart!

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 from 5:30-8:30p.m.: Meet the candidates for Whatcom County Council and Bellingham City Council and provide feedback to the political committee for the Sierra Club Mt. Baker Group. The event is being held at YWCA, 1026 N Forest St, Bellingham, WA 98225. Social hour will start at 5:30p.m. (bring an appetizer to share if you wish) and the program starts at 6:15p.m. Please visit the Riveters Collective calendar or Facebook to learn more.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017, from 6:30-8:00p.m.: Come and learn how you can help Riveters Collective Earth Team plan and promote environment-related action.  We shall meet at Bellingham Public Market, 1530 Cornwall Ave., in the conference room (near Film is Truth).

Saturday, June 3, 2017 from 9:00-11:00a.m.: Come join the UterRun Fun Walk or Run. All proceeds go to benefit the Mt. Baker Planned Parenthood. Please visit Facebook for tickets.

Step Three to Taking Action

Now you are informed and ready- time to act! Your best two tactics are your money and your time. Let’s talk $$.

Photo by Newton Free Library on flickr. Used under Creative Commons license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/

First, donations.

There are a bajillion organizations working to do good. Many run on donations. It can be hard to figure out who to donate to. What do you care about? Which organizations are legit? How much money? How often? What about local groups vs. national organizations?

Narrow it down
This might be difficult. Many of us care about all of it- the environment, women’s rights, healthcare, LGBTQ rights, etc. Try picking your top three issues and start with those. Maybe even make a calendar where you focus on different issues each month or quarter.
This is a good list of ideas (check the comments, too): http://jezebel.com/a-list-of-pro-wo…

Find legitimate organizations
Charity Navigator is a great tool to help you decide who will use your donation effectively.

Every bit helps
If you only have a few bucks to spare and are wondering if it’s even worth donating that much, know that it DOES HELP. We are working on a scale of millions of people making donations. A buck or two adds up.

If you can swing an automatic monthly donation, go for it.

Think globally, act locally (and nationally and globally)
Don’t forget about your hometown organizations. You can often have the most impact with these small fish. Use our Civic Tithing tool to help find local organizations and set up monthly donations. Also, Charity Navigator has a rich search function, including a way to look for local charities: https://www.charitynavigator.org/in…

 

It’s also time to boycott

You can also make a difference with your everyday spending habits.

Anti-Trump
You can choose to spend your money at places that do not support Trump or his family’s businesses. Shannon Coulter started the #grabyourwallet boycott in late October. Here is the current list of business to boycott, scripts to use to tell them why you’re boycotting, and alternative businesses to use instead: https://grabyourwallet.org/

Pro-justice
You can also sign up to participate in the Injustice Boycott, which began last December. This boycott is about preventing police brutality and racial injustice.
Do you know of any other current boycotts?

That’s your first action: donate and spend wisely. Next up, how to use your time to make a difference.

Missed step two? Read it here.

Ready for step four? Read it here.

Take action:

Civic Tithing

Civic tithing can stabilize funding for our local organizations in an uncertain economic future. And that future will arrive on January 20. From the Old English for “one-tenth”, tithing has traditionally meant giving part of one’s income to a church or government. In civic tithing, we take the routine giving concept and apply it to civic and community organizations in Whatcom County. Together, our group could improve and stabilize the financial outlook for organizations serving our community in 2017.

First, decide how much of your income you could part with on a monthly or yearly basis, whether 0.1% or 10%. Take the annual cost and divide by 12. Then set up monthly donations to an organization in that amount.

To help you identify organizations, a few Pantsuit Bellingham members curated this list for us. Improvements to this list and tool are coming, but we’re pushing this in draft form so you can start using it now. You can search by topic; that’s pretty much the only bell or whistle.

Please note: As always, we welcome your constructive feedback (especially if it is packaged with an offer of help in improving the online accessibility of this list)!

Take action:
How much $/month are you pledging to donate to these groups? Enter the monthly total in the box. Your response is ANONYMOUS and will help Pantsuit Bellingham demonstrate our people power!

Womxn’s Marches – Bellingham, Seattle, DC


We’re getting a lot of questions about the Women’s Marches.  Here are links to information for marches in Bellingham, Seattle and DC.

Womxn’s March on Washington – Bellingham

Event Information
Website
Facebook page
Facebook event

 

Womxn’s March – Washington State – Seattle

Event Information
Website
Facebook group
Facebook event

Transportation
Our bus is full, and there are at least three buses departing from Bellingham for the march.  I will update this as I get new information.  If you don’t have a ticket and you want one, watch the Pantsuit Bellingham Facebook feed and then bus event closely, I have seen several posts selling tickets in the past couple of days.

If you purchased a bus ticket through Pantsuit Bellingham and Bellair Charters, your bus departure information:
Sunset Square Kmart parking lot at 7a.m. on 21 January 2017.
Join the Facebook Event for some pre-march pep-talking and organizing.

If you have a ticket for a bus chartered by Whatcom Democratic Women’s Club, event details can be found here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/womens-march-charter-bus-round-trip-bellingham-tickets-30571121046

 

Women’s March on Washington – D.C.

Event Information
Website
Facebook page

 

 

Sanctuary X – A Status Report

The president-elect’s statements around deportation of undocumented people has prompted a call for bold statements from local institutions. Our Sanctuary X action team is researching what it means to be a “Sanctuary” city or institution, what institutions can and should take a position on immigration enforcement, and the current state of their policies (see our draft here).

Our Sanctuary X group is compiling answers to these questions so we can:

1. Identify opportunities for action. How do current policies compare with the goals of groups representing undocumented people – such as Western’s Blue Group and Community to Community Development?

2. Identify mechanisms for filling the gaps. How can we join the efforts of existing groups? Where efforts don’t already exist, how can we be most effective.

3. Take action to affect progress toward the identified goals.

If you have relevant information or want to work with us on supporting the human rights of undocumented people in our community, please send an email to pantsuitbellingham@gmail.com .

Diverse Books Pledge

Literature that “reflects and honors the lives of all young people” (www.weneeddiversebooks.org) is essential to creating a more just society.  Children, and the people who read to them, benefit immeasurably from both seeing themselves in books and from the opportunity to listen to and learn one another’s stories.  Currently, the experiences of people of color, people with disabilities,  and LBGTQ  people are vastly under-represented in children’s and young adult books.  Let’s help change that!

Wade Hudson, CEO of Just Us Books, an independent publisher that celebrates the diversity of Black people, history, and culture, offers a Diverse Books Pledge which provides ideas for concrete  actions to make a difference.  It begins…

To help increase the number of quality children’s books that help celebrate diversity, and to support the diverse books already available, I pledge to:  

…and goes on to outline 10 very do-able steps to take, from buying books from small presses/publishers owned by people of color, to writing on-line reviews.

Some resources to help in carrying out the Diverse Books Pledge:

Websites/Book Lists

We Need Diverse Books  – a great resource for information and inspiration, including a full page of book lists.  We Need Diverse Books is grassroots organization of children’s book lovers that advocates essential changes in the publishing industry to produce and promote literature that reflects and honors the lives of all young people.

Lee & Low Blog – Lee & Low: About Everyone, For Everyone, is the largest multicultural children’s book publisher in the country, and also one of the few minority-owned publishers in the U.S.  Their blog highlights a variety of books and offers author interviews and educator resources.

Coretta Scott King Book Award -given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.

Pura Belpre Award -is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.

Mighty Girl Book Lists -Offers a huge collection of titles with filters that make for efficient searching.

50 Multicultural Books Every Child Should Know – an age appropriate list of titles compiled by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a study and research library.

Publishers/Small Presses

Person of Color Owned Small Presses/Publishers

Articles

The Apartheid of Children’s Literature  by Christopher Myers

Where Are the People of Color in Children’s Books? by Walter Dean Myers

Equity in Publishing: What Should Editors Be Doing?  by Antonio Aiello